Going Greek: Fresh imports, served here

Posted by on Feb 10th, 2011 and filed under Dining, Featured. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

There are few restaurateurs gutsy enough to come to a city dripping with over-the-top ostentation and try to succeed by keeping it simple. But Costas Spiliadis is determined to wade through the sometimes overly-complicated menus of Las Vegas and stick with his Greek roots—a formula that has worked in his other restaurants in Greece, Montreal and New York.

Costas Spiliadis in Estiatorio Milos Las Vegas

Costas Spiliadis at Estiatorio Milos

At Estiatorio Milos at The Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas, Spiliadis insists on both locals and tourists alike enjoying “a restaurant that is dedicated to providing honest, healthy and tasty food.”

This includes dishes like the Milos Special, a signature at the restaurant that features paper-thin slices of eggplant and zucchini. These sweet slices of vegetables are then served with house-made tzatziki sauce and cubes of saganaki—fried cheese served with a hint of lemon.

However, other than the Milos Special and one or two other dishes, you might not realize you’re in a Greek restaurant. There is no heavy moussaka or greasy gyro on the menu, two popular Greek-American dishes. Instead, much of the food is surprisingly light and fresh.

“The dream of my life is to showcase the amazing virtues of the misunderstood Greek food and Greek cuisine,” says Spidialis.

The authenticity of Greek food for Spiliadis begins in the water. The seafood is the star at Milos. It is as fresh as possible and mainly imported from the Mediterranean. Because of the seafood’s extensive travels, the food here isn’t cheap, but the preparation is surprisingly simple. Most fish are primed with salt, lemon and olive oil — and that’s about it. That’s because the quality of the fish is superb and it doesn’t need much else.

A display case filled with ice features fresh (and sometimes still moving) catches of the day. As a guest, you can select from this display what you’d like to have for dinner. Gorgeous red snapper, langoustines and sea bass are just a few of the options. The large case in front of the kitchen is like none other in Vegas and is a great way to interact with the chefs and staff in the restaurant.

Estiatorio Milos

Estiatorio Milos

Estiatorio Milos is truly a unique experience on the Las Vegas Strip. It’s not just the only Greek restaurant in a Strip hotel, but it also boasts a unique-to-Vegas, fresh look on what Greek food is and can be.

Even with this edge on the competition, Spidialis is cautious to keep the quality of the food to his self-imposed high standards.

“I have raised my standards so high, that I sometimes feel like Icarus and if I get too close to the sun, I’m afraid the sun will melt my wings,” Spiliadis chuckles.

Luckily, the simple and delicious food is so good, its doubtful he’ll get burned.

Estiatorio Milos
The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Hours: Sunday – Thursday, 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.
Friday & Saturday, 5 p.m. – midnight.
Average price: $50 and up

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